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2019 Special Release

Copy of wbec60.indd

DORSET FINE ARTS is pleased to release three spectacular prints in honour of the

60th Anniversary of the West Baffin Eskimo Co-op.

This release is comprised of one stonecut, one lithograph and one etching, representing the three primary print techniques used at Kinngait Studios and acknowledging the accomplishments of the artists and printers over the past sixty years.


DORSET FINE ARTS DOES NOT SELL DIRECTLY TO THE PUBLIC. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN PURCHASING ARTWORK YOU CAN DO SO THROUGH ONE OF OUR LISTED GALLERIES


NINGIUKULU TEEVEE

Glittering Walrus, 2019

Etching, Aquatint and Hand Colouring

Paper: Arches White

Printer: Studio PM

78 x 121 cm

Edition of 50

$1800

 

OOLOOSIE SAILA

Silaksiaq (Beautiful Day), 2019

Lithograph

Paper: Arches Cover White

Printer: Niveaksie Quvianaqtuliaq

76.3 x 111.2 cm

Edition of 30

$1000

 

PITALOOSIE SAILA

Tattoed Sun, 1988

Stonecut

Paper: Unknown

Printer: Qavavau Manumie & Iyola Kingwatsiak

49 x 64 cm

Edition of 25

$1200

 

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NINGIUKULU (NINGEOKULUK) TEEVEE

1963-


A couple of years ago I made Shaman Revealed, a drawing that was based on the Kiviuq legend of a woman turning into a fox. I wanted to show how people could change from one thing to another but still be the same person. A zipper came to mind and I thought, that’s a really nice idea, so I used the zipper to show how they change.
-Ningiukulu Teevee (From Uuturautiit: Cape Dorset Celebrates Fifty Years of Printmaking, 2009)

Ningiukulu is one of the most versatile and intelligent graphic artists to emerge from the Kinngait Studios Born May 27, 1963, Ningiukulu is the daughter of Joanasie Salomonie (deceased) and his wife Kanajuk. Her father, Joanasie, was a community leader and much loved in Cape Dorset for his sense of humour, mischief and compassion. In the fall of 2009, Ningiukulu ’s first children’s book was published by Groundwood Books (A Division of House of Anansi Press). Entitled Alego, it is an autobiographical story of a young girl named Alego who goes clamdigging with
her grandmother for the first time and, along the way, discovers all of the wonders of the seashore. The book was short-listed for the Governor General’s Literary Award for children’s illustration.
Since her first prints appeared in the collection in 2004, Ningiukulu has been one of Kinngait’s studio’s most celebrated artists. She has a comprehensive knowledge of Inuit legends and a fine sense of design and composition. These elements that have made many of her prints highly sought after by collectors. Ningiukulu has had numerous solo shows of her bold and resplendent drawings and some of her work has been featured in exhibitions in major public galleries and museums.

PLEASE NOTE: The name change from Ningeokuluk to Ningiukulu as of March 2017.


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OOLOOSIE SAILA

1991

As a child, Ooloosie was inspired to draw through occasional visits to the home of Kenojuak Ashevak. At age 14 she won first prize at her high school drawing contest. She began selling her drawings to the Co-op in 2015 and continues to explore many divers themes and ideas in her work.


© William Ritchie

© William Ritchie

PITALOOSIE SAILA

1942-


I remember how Inuit used to live, thinking of them back then, my relatives. I also recall how the clothing was made; that is what I base my drawings on when I draw people.
-Pitaloosie Saila

(From “Kinngait: Riding Light Into the World; Producer: Site Media; Director: Annette Mangaard)

Pitaloosie was born in 1942 on the southwest coast of Baffin Island near what is now the community of Cape Dorset. She spent her childhood years in various hospitals in Quebec and Ontario for treatment of tuberculosis. She learned
English during this time, and recalls the difficulty she experienced in relearning her native language upon her return to Baffin Island in 1957. She is now one of the few of her generation who speak both English and Inuktitut fluently.

Pitaloosie began drawing in the early 1960’s, and quickly established herself as a versatile and intelligent graphic artist.
Over the years, she has become a familiar presence in the Kinngait Studios, and her work has been included in annual
print collections since 1968.

Since the late 1960’s, Pitaloosie has made frequent trips to southern Canada to attend exhibitions and conferences. In 1967, she spent several weeks in Toronto while her husband, the well-known sculptor Pauta Saila, participated in an International Sculpture Symposium. Subsequently, she has visited Halifax, Toronto, Ottawa, Kansas City and Vermont. Her work has been featured in solo drawing exhibitions, and in 1977, Canada Post issued a stamp depicting her print, Fisherman’s Dream. Her 1985 lithograph entitled In the Hills represented the Northwest Territories in the centennial celebration of the National Parks of Canada. Amnesty International, the international human rights organization, selected a drawing by Pitaloosie entitled Mother and Child to use for their 1990 Christmas card. She was also one of nine featured artists in the acclaimed exhibition Isumavut: The Artistic Expression of Nine Cape Dorset Women, which opened at the Canadian Museum of Civilization in the fall of 1994 and continues to travel to other venues. Pitaloosie’s husband, Pauta, passed away in Cape Dorset in June of 2009 at the age of 93. In 2004, both she and Pauta were appointed members of the Royal Canadian Academy of the Arts, in recognition of their life’s work and contributions to Canadian art.